Elk Creek Restoration Project Highlights Future of Chesapeake Conservation

Chesapeake Conservancy recently joined partners to install vegetation and structures to reduce nutrient and sediment runoff and improve water quality on a property on Elk Creek, a tributary of Penns Creek, in Centre County, PA.

The partners planted a 35-foot wide riparian buffer along a 1000-foot agriculturally impaired stretch of the stream. This is one of six sites that are part of a new mapping validation project to identify where restoration can have the greatest benefits to water quality and wildlife habitat.

“Through this project, Chesapeake Conservancy and our partners are using precision conservation—projects at the right place, the right scale, the right size, the right time, and making sure they are working—to pilot a new approach to conservation. Instead of sweeping acquisitions or all-encompassing legislation, we can use the latest high-resolution datasets to conduct advanced geospatial analysis to better target and implement best management practices,” Chesapeake Conservancy President and CEO Joel Dunn said.

Project partners included the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Habitat Forever, the Foundation for California University of Pennsylvania, Penns Valley Conservation Association, Seven Willows LLC, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. Funding for the project was provided by USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, Pennsylvania DEP Growing Greener and Glen’s Garden Market, and Winghaven Nursery donated nursery stock.